About Method Architecture

Method Architecture, LLC is a Native American-owned architecture and interior design firm. Method is certified as a Minority Owned Business (MBE) with multiple entities across the region and a Historically Underutilized Business (HUB) through the State of Texas.

With our uniquely ego-free team of architects and designers, we create environments that emphasize diversity by designing spaces that highlight our clients’ capabilities and increase their overall potential in each of their specific trades. We celebrate different points of view and project approaches to help both our company and our designs to reach maximum success. As a Native-American owned firm with project experience in the public sphere, we understand and often deal with matters of inclusion, diversity and meeting specific diversity goals for projects. Method is a strong proponent in ensuring we utilize a diverse set of outside consultants for every project we work on, and we appreciate when other firms consider our minority status when doing the same.

Our Certifications

History & Choctaw Lineage

Rayburn “Jake” Donaldson, Managing Partner at Method Architecture, is a member of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma. His known family heritage within the Choctaw Nation dates back to 1800s to his Great-Great-Great Grandfather, Turner Brashears Turnbull, born in 1816.

1st Known Generation (1816-1893)
[Right to Left]
Jerico (Perkins) Turnbull (1820-1893) and Turner Brashears Turnbull (1814-1877). They came to the Mississippi Territory during the Trail of Tears.

[Right to Left]
Jerico (Perkins) Turnbull (1820-1893) and Turner Brashears Turnbull (1814-1877). They came to the Mississippi Territory during the Trail of Tears.

2nd Known Generation (1847-1917)
Turner and Jerico had a daughter, Maryann Turnbull who married Charles Henry Benton. Maryann and Charles Benton went on to have 8 children.

Turner and Jerico had a daughter, Maryann Turnbull who married Charles Henry Benton. Maryann and Charles Benton went on to have 8 children.

Maryann (Turnbull) Benton – 1856-1917

Charles Henry Benton – 1847-1888
His father was Wakatombi and mother was Shakapahoma.

3rd Generation (1880-1967)
Theodore Henry Benton (aka Toad) was one of Maryann and Charles' 8 children and was full-blood Choctaw. Toad is registered on the Dawes Final Roll of the Five Civilized Tribes, Roll #10829.

Theodore Henry Benton (aka Toad) was one of Maryann and Charles' 8 children and was full-blood Choctaw. Toad is registered on the Dawes Final Roll of the Five Civilized Tribes, Roll #10829.

Toad married Phoebe “Onie” Fitzer. This photo is from their 50th wedding celebration. Toad and Onie also had 8 children.

4th Generation (1907-2000)
Irene Ida (Benton) Coe was the daughter of Toad and Onie Benton. She had two children: Benton and John Coe.

Irene Ida (Benton) Coe was the daughter of Toad and Onie Benton. She had two children: Benton and John Coe.

5th Generation (1930-2005)
Benton Duane Coe was born in 1930. He had three children: Nancy, Beni, and Colin.

Benton Duane Coe was born in 1930. He had three children: Nancy, Beni, and Colin.

6th Generation (1954-Present)
Nancy Coe Donaldson was the daughter of Benton Duane Coe.

Nancy Coe Donaldson was the daughter of Benton Duane Coe.

The Current Generation
Rayburn "Jake" Donaldson is the son of Nancy (Coe) Donaldson. He is passing on the Choctaw blood line to his 4 children: Michael, Will, Maddie, and Elizabeth (beans)

Rayburn "Jake" Donaldson is the son of Nancy (Coe) Donaldson. He is passing on the Choctaw blood line to his 4 children: Michael, Will, Maddie, and Elizabeth (beans)

Significant Dates in Choctaw History
  • 1820: The history of the Choctaw Nation in Oklahoma began in 1820 when tribal leaders in central Mississippi signed the Treaty of Doak’s Stand, ceding rich cotton lands in the delta region east of the Mississippi River for approximately thirteen million acres in the Canadian, Kiamichi, Arkansas, and Red River watersheds in southeastern Oklahoma.
  • 1830: Andrew Jackson pushed his Indian Removal Act through Congress in 1830 forcing more Natives out of the territory.